VITAMIN D: A SUPER HELP FOR INTESTINAL WELL-BEING

vitamina D
vitamina D

If you've ever had a full blood test, you've certainly seen it vitamina D in your body. Surely it will have been very low.

This vitamin is very important for ours Wellnessbut alas, nowadays that we are office animals, we can no longer produce enough for our body.

Vitamin D is in fact produced by our body by absorbing the sun's rays through our skin. It is an excellent aid for the absorption of calcium and phosphorus in the bones, which are essential for preventing osteoporosis in adulthood. It also helps the body stay healthy and protect itself from infectious or viral diseases.

Its properties also adapt very well to the intestine. Taking vitamin D helps the intestine to strengthen, become stronger and work better without it get too inflamed. In the care of a irritable colon it is very useful to supplement our diet with this vitamin. It will give great help, without irritating, to your intestines.

Perhaps not everyone knows that most of us, if not all, are deficient in this vitamin and should be supplemented in adulthood. I speak for ages 25 and up. Even if we are young, we certainly lack it. Today we spend little time in the sun and outdoors. This does not at all help our body to generate vitamin D. The food that contains it is little and does not always reach all tastes.

The foods that contain it the most are

  • Mushrooms
  • Liver meat
  • Bovine liver
  • Cod liver oil
  • Butter
  • Fatty cheeses
  • Mackerel
  • Tuna
  • Salmon
  • Oysters
  • Shrimp

You also see that in addition to personal tastes, these foods are difficult to take and digest for a person suffering from irritable colon and intolerances.

So if you are not particularly fond of liver or cod liver oil, you should do a check up and, if necessary, start taking it. This vitamin, which is one of the hardest to get, is a great helper for your body. Surely your bones and even your intestines will thank you!

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